2015 Update - Million Dollar To Do List

2015 Update - Million Dollar To Do List

In April 2014, I announced a major financial goal to ensure my husband and I are assured to remain financially independent with no worries about now having "enough". We deeply value the ability to decide what to do in life, whether that includes working or not. It gives us the peace of mind of knowing we'll always have the freedom to make personal and career choices.

We currently have enough to live off for over 25 years*, but it just doesn't quite feel like enough, so we decided to set a goal.

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Do I Know Who I Am? Can Anyone Really Answer That Question?

Do I Know Who I Am? Can Anyone Really Answer That Question?

Reflections from three years living a financially-independent lifestyle.

It’s now been three years since I walked away from my job in corporate Canada. I find it surprising that it feels like it’s been so long and yet still feels so new. 

I initially called the move away from demanding salaried work a financial-independence leap—which it was—but I think that definition missed the point. Living with the means to do what we want—thanks to having a lifestyle that’s in line with our means—is more than just about being able to pay our bills and pay for the activities we want to engage in. For me it’s about being able to reclaim—rediscover even—who I am, only I didn’t know it at the time. 

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Sabbaticals for the Rest of Us - Lessons from My 4-month Leave

Sabbaticals for the Rest of Us - Lessons from My 4-month Leave

Sabbaticals are traditionally a time of paid leave for academics to travel or work on projects that would not be possible to focus on during a given academic year. The structure of the academic sabbatical is often for these professionals to take such a leave every seventh year*, with both the word and its frequency having roots with the word "sabbath". 

These rejuvenation periods are a unique opportunity to take a step back from the daily grind. Universities understood the benefit for an individual to have a chance to think, discover and experience a different perspective. After all, they employed thinking professionals.

Given our thought economy, doesn't it make sense to expand the use of sabbaticals? 

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Are You Not Entertained?

Are You Not Entertained?

Is the Hunger Games Series a Caricature of Our World?

I’ve enjoyed watching the The Hunger Games film series. It includes all the usual exciting exploits and special effects that make today’s action and adventure movies entertaining and immersive. Though the package is all it promises to be, it’s the underlying theme of a society that’s lost its values and direction that I find fascinating. 

When we take a moment to consider it, the parallels between it and our current reality are, at best, unsettling.

What does the series and our world have in common?

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Knowing vs Doing: Part 2 - Money Lies

Knowing vs Doing: Part 2 - Money Lies

As I introduced in the previous post, a lot of our behaviour is triggered by emotions and we use denial and avoidance—playing ostrich, playing dumb and acting helpless—to keep ourselves from changing what we know deep down is preventing us from being more successful and fulfilled than we currently are.

Though debunking our personal fabrications is powerful in and of itself, debunking commonly-held beliefs that are built on these fabrications can further empower us to consider what’s really needed to lead a successful and fulfilling life.

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Knowing vs Doing: Part 1 - Our Lizard Brain

Knowing vs Doing: Part 1 - Our Lizard Brain

It’s April again, which means it’s Financial Literacy month. I love that the month chosen to remind us to teach ourselves and others (especially children) about financial matters also includes the infamous prankster day. That fact never gets old. 

What does get old is that the focus on financial literacy is based on the idea that people don’t know enough to be able to manage money successfully.

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My 2015-2016 Reading List

My 2015-2016 Reading List

I finally get to post my third summary edition of a year's worth of reading (for reference, here's the first year and second year). From April 2015 to March 2016, I've managed to read, and learn from, a total of 74 books. That's 218 in total since becoming truly free to pursue.

I can't believe I've just wrapped up three years of what I consider hard-core reading. I love diving into so many exciting topics and it gets even better when I get to draw connections between subjects and ideas I previously thought unrelated. 

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